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Cabbage Head Sprouts

15 Nov

cabbage head sproutsGrowing your own sprouts or microgreens in the fall and winter is an excellent way to ensure a continual supply of greens when fresh options are limited. Some people consider them to be a superfood. Others claim they are a great survival food. I would simply say, sprouts are nutritious and contain none of the harmful things found in processed food, making them a good choice to incorporate into a whole foods diet. Sprouts grown at home retain their nutrients better than produce that has traveled long distances and sat on a shelf, waiting to be purchased. Sprouting or soaking grains and legumes, greatly increases their nutritional value and digestibility by mitigating the effects of antinutrients.

Here’s the simple break down on how to grow your own sprouts:

Soak seeds over night. Drain the next day. Rinse, drain and repeat twice a day. Keep out of direct sun. No dirt. Wash and remove the hulls. Rinse. Drain. Eat. Refrigerate. Eat some more.

I use one tablespoon of seed per quart mason jar. This is my newest organic mix, Cabbage Head, containing: red clover, red cabbage, green cabbage, pink kale, and broccoli.

soaking seedssoaking…

sprouted seedfive days later…

What to do with your sprouts: add to salads, wraps, sandwiches, appetizers, fresh spring rolls, soups, dips, omelets, or eat plain.

Interested in other organic sprout seeds? You can find them at our Moonlight Micro-Farm online shop.

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2 Comments

Posted by on November 15, 2011 in Cooking and Gardening, DIY, Sprouts & Micro-greens

 

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2 responses to “Cabbage Head Sprouts

  1. latetedelegumes

    November 15, 2011 at 3:49 pm

    Oh my! This is such a fantastic idea. I love sprouts and I never knew how easy it’d be to grow my own. It also looks so pretty inside the jar! Thank you for sharing.

     
    • elitrope

      November 15, 2011 at 4:22 pm

      Thanks for stopping by! One key piece of information that is missing from the post, is that I use a mesh screen on top of the jar for air circulation and to drain.

       

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